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Scientific American on Widlife Crossings

Posted by on Jun 4, 2013 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Scientific American on Widlife Crossings

Excellent piece on wildlife crossings in the May online issue of Scientific American, focusing on the impacts of animal-vehicle collisions on small fauna in Florida and elsewhere.

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Do Wildlife Crossing Work?

Posted by on Apr 26, 2013 in Connectivity | 0 comments

Do Wildlife Crossing Work?

Seeing is believing, and these pronghorn are clearly telling us that the answer is yes. They are crossing over one of two new (since 2012) wildlife overpasses constructed over Highway 191, west of Pinedale, Wyoming. These overpasses, along with 6 underpasses and 12 miles of 8-foot high wildlife fencing, are part of an impressive mitigation project led by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department and the Wyoming Department of Transportation, in partnership with a number of other agency, corporate and non-profit organizations. These mitigation...

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Lynx on the Move

Posted by on Aug 22, 2012 in Connectivity | 0 comments

Lynx on the Move

A synthesis of ten years worth of telemetry, GPS and tracking data from Colorado Parks and Wildlife is giving us a better picture of how lynx are dispersing through the Southern Rockies. Since the start of the reintroduction effort in southwest Colorado, lynx have expanded their range even across the formidable barrier of I-70. Fortunately, most of these animals have made it safely, however, with the imminent expansion of the interstate and escalating traffic volumes, safe crossings will become increasingly challenging for lynx and other...

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What Kind of Driver Are YOU?

Posted by on Aug 2, 2012 in Connectivity | Comments Off on What Kind of Driver Are YOU?

What Kind of Driver Are YOU?

More evidence that science is fun…. and revealing! NASA scientist Mark Rober demonstrates that 6% of drivers actually go out of their way to hit animals that present no threat to them. Don’t despair, though – Rober’s study also captured drivers who stopped to help animals get out of the road so that they won’t be run over… engaging whatever means necessary.      

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The Origins of Collaboration

Posted by on Jun 29, 2012 in Collaboration | Comments Off on The Origins of Collaboration

The Origins of Collaboration

Collaboration, it turns out, has evolutionary advantages, and humans aren’t the only species that benefits from acting in cooperation with one another. According to the cover story in the latest issue of Scientific American, cooperation has driven evolution since the very beginnings of life on this planet. The classic example in nature is that of the beehive – worker bees all cooperating to support their queen and, thereby, perpetuate their hive. Elephants collaborate by gathering together to protect their young in the face of a...

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Archives: Anything But Wild

Posted by on Oct 25, 2010 in Biodiversity | Comments Off on Archives: Anything But Wild

Archives: Anything But Wild

I didn’t set off on my lunch hour on a wildlife expedition. I slipped into my spandex to get a little mid-day exercise and the bike path along the South Platte River conveniently passes right in front of my office. The riverfront is significantly more utilitarian than scenic, as the river winds its way through Denver’s urban-industrial core. Still, the city and adjoining municipalities have recognized the great value that such trails bring to urban livability, and the trail connects the southwestern-most suburbs with those in the...

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Archives: From Where I’m Standing

Posted by on Mar 25, 2009 in Connectivity | Comments Off on Archives: From Where I’m Standing

Archives: From Where I’m Standing

The Southern Rockies are blessed with a wealth of biological diversity. Alpine tundra, sagebrush grasslands, and forests mixed with pine and aspen are just a few of the native habitat types that contribute to the biological complexity of the region. Native cutthroat trout spawn in alpine streams, some of the nation’s largest deer and elk herds migrate between the river basins and high elevation mountains of northwest Colorado, and reintroduced lynx are gradually making a comeback in Colorado’s montane forests. Now add a highway to this...

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